Tag: divorce

(via What Will Alimony Do to Your Tax Return?)

(via What Will Alimony Do to Your Tax Return?)

Divorced Couples Living Together: It Does Happen! (For Tax Reasons)

Think about the future here. Let go of the animosity (especially if you have kids!), because sometimes while the pain and tumult of divorce can be overwhelming, sometimes the money issues, especially with the house, can hurt even more! Something you honestly don’t want….

You Might Be Divorcing Your Spouse, But Try Not to Divorce Your Entire Life

Might be asking much, but when it comes to your taxes, you have an option here (as crazy as it may be). You can live in the home together. Promote stability. Be civil. Care. This also keeps all tax obligations amicable and mutual, neither side benefiting or hurting more than it should.
And here’s the bonus: you get more bonus tax advantages when you do eventually sell the home!
Also do keep in mind that just because you also own the home, doesn’t mean you always have to technically live there either. However, your mail will continue to arrive at that house. So make sure the ex-spouse realizes that and doesn’t shred the material every time he/she sees your name.

It’s the Simplest Way to Get Taxes Figured Out About the House

But it’s not for the faint of heart. Talk to a consultant with the Income Tax Planning Network about it some more and see if this may be an option for you. Check out this guide on taxes during a divorce as well for more possibilities. Because, remember: it’s just a house.

How to Maximize Taxes With Your Ex-Spouse and a Vacation Home

We raise the question, because home selling has a specific benefit many enjoy: the tax benefits. That’s what we mean when we say we can maximize taxes by taking advantage of the exemptions. Deductions, deductions, deductions. You get all the profit when you sell.

But Only When the Property Is Your Actual Homemaximize taxes vacation home

Case in point: a vacation home won’t apply to those same exemptions. So what can you do? If you want to sell that vacation home, be prepared; you might have to pay taxes on it. And this is precisely the case when facing divorce, a situation littered with plenty of options regarding property.

Be prepared to pay some capital gains tax if you sell that vacation home. How much that tax will be will depend on your actual income. So let’s say you don’t have a whole lot of income, and your ex-spouse transfers ownership to you… Sell that vacation home, and you can retain a great portion of that profit down the road.

There is the possibility of a ‘partial exclusion’, though, where you may prove that you’ve lived in the residence for two years or more. If that’s the case, selling the vacation home can earn you 40% of the profit that would otherwise go to capital gains tax. Might be a pretty good option for you as well as the ex-spouse!

Either Way You Look at It, You’re Going to Need to Consult the Experts to Maximize Taxes

A qualified and experienced divorce attorney will help you tremendously regarding that vacation home. Maximize taxes, of course, by registering with an expert from the Income Tax Planning Network. Find out whether or not you want that vacation home on your plate. It all depends on what you want to pay on taxes or not. Because remember: it’s just property. Think of your finances.

 

 

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What to Do With Rental Properties on Taxes When Getting Divorced

RTO is one thing; what about rental properties? What if you are the landlord/homeowner? What if you are the one offering that rent-to-own property? What if you are the one offering that rent-to-own property, and you get divorced with your spouse? What can you do with those rental properties? How does that affect your taxes? What will happen to your tenants?

Questions, Questions, Questions — Stressful, Stressful, STRESSFULrental properties knot

Whenever on the subject of taxes, the prospect’s overwhelming. You’ve got that tax return to file. You’re not great with numbers — and let’s not forget about the fact that you’re dealing with divorce, and there are plenty of options on your plate about what to do with the home (and the kids, finances, cars, etc. etc.). Now you have to also worry about rental properties, tenants, and other stuff. It can be a headache.

Here’s what you have to understand about rental property: they’re not your primary residences. Hence tax issues will be a bit different than when considering your actual home, the actual place you live in.

We all know there are tax benefits when selling a home (only when it’s your actual place of residence, though). When you divorce, the question is this: do you want to share ownership of those rental properties (in which case you’ll both pay taxes on them)? Or do you want to transfer ownership to the ex-spouse? It’s good to know that transfer of ownership won’t cause any tax repercussions for either spouse. However, you most likely will pay taxes if and when you ever sell those rental properties; so keep that in mind.

Those Rental Properties Need to Be Addressed

Of course, rental properties are a source of revenue. You want it, you pay property taxes for it; you don’t want it, transfer ownership. If both spouses don’t want the rental properties in question — be prepared. Consult with an attorney, if you will, but be sure to discuss your situation with an expert from the Income Tax Planning Network immediately. You don’t want to leave this loose end untied.

 

The post What to Do With Rental Properties on Taxes When Getting Divorced appeared first on RentToOwnReviews.

Maximizing Tax Benefits for Selling the Home After Kids Grow Up

Divorce doesn’t have to destroy the kids. There are options out there, and they’re not to blame. So it just so happens that many divorcing couples find the option to keep the home when dealing with a divorce until those kids move out when they’re older. There’s a specific reason to doing this, in that it’s not going to be a forever thing when owning the home indefinitely — eventually, that home will get sold!

The Tax Benefits Are Obvious, But Keep This Important Point in Mind….divorce tax-5

If you’re going to sell that home later on, make sure you get that attorney on your side to stipulate in the divorce agreement that the home still is your “main residence” for tax purposes. The law states that you won’t get the tax benefits of selling the home if you’re not living in the home for at least two of the last five years of that primary residence.

So if the son and daughter are only in their teen years, and you’ve moved out, selling the home leaves you high and dry while the ex-spouse reaps the tax benefits. Therefore make a point to research with the Income Tax Planning Network and find out what you need to do to settle the issue correctly.

Because Selling a Home Can Be a Benefit

Tax benefit, to be exact. It just takes timing. And divorce is anything but timely. Make it a point to sign up with ITPN and talk to an expert immediately. Get the lawyer, too, while you’re at it. Divorce doesn’t have to destroy the finances, especially when you’re facing the issue of selling that home. Either you sell the home and make anywhere around $250K in profit, or you’re not paying attention to those tax laws and have to fork over a ton of that profit to the IRS. You pick.

The post Maximizing Tax Benefits for Selling the Home After Kids Grow Up appeared first on Your Rent-to-Own Consultants.

Should Your Ex-Spouse Buy the Home From You for Tax Reasons?

The answer could very well be yes — for obvious tax reasons. Now we’re not saying, though, that taxes will benefit the buyer in this case. Rather, this will be a mutual benefit in selling the home during a divorce, and here’s why:

Being Free and Clear of the Obligations

The situation has to fit; we’ll say that much. As there are plenty of divorce tax options regarding the home divorce tax-4to choose from.

Let’s say you want to keep the house. Your ex-spouse understands that and has no problems leaving except for the fact that you’re going to have to pay up some money to own the house solely on your own. In essence, you’re buying off your ex-spouse by paying his/her share of the ownership.

Tax reasons in this situation require some negotiation, though — a fair price has to be agreed upon by both parties, and once both sign on the dotted line, the one selling the share of the home gets that name removed off the deed. On the one hand, if you’re buying, you’re paying up extra money; however, guess what: that property’s all yours. On the other hand, if you’re selling, you’re getting some money in your pocket; this does mean, though, you absolutely have to move out.

Now keep in mind that negotiations don’t necessarily have to end up clear across the middle. Oftentimes divorced couples will negotiate on a buyout price that reflects the income. It’s a fair price; not an equitable one.

You Benefit Through Tax Reasons in This Way….

As in, you don’t pay any taxes as a result of the buyout, saving you some tax trouble down the road. Of course, the negotiations can require some legal planning, which you can sign up for right here; and, of course, you’re going to want to consult with an expert from the Income Tax Planning Network immediately.

Don’t hesitate. Do it now. That divorce shouldn’t have to drag out too much.